When physicians consult specialists in the hospital, it's because they are seeking expert advice in an area of medicine outside their own specialty and expertise. And medical charts these days are already crowded enough without the fluff added by auto-generated, novel-length templates and useless nursing notes. So when someone from a specialist service writes a consult note, it's generally expected that their note contain useful information and specific recommendations. Unlike, for example, the utterly useless note above authored by some cardiology FNP. (Speaking of which, why the fuck is a FNP working in cardiology?) Quite frankly, if your consult note's assessment/plan consists of literally nothing more than "I will review the case with my attending" you are a complete waste of hospital oxygen and deserve to be immediately fired. As is often the case in life, if you have nothing useful to say, keep your mouth shut. Surely, a first-year internal medicine resident could bullshit a much more useful and believable cardiology consult than the one above merely by virtue of creating a word salad with some combination of the phrases "EKG", "echocardiogram", "stress test", and "cardiac catheterization"! This is exactly why midlevel providers need to be kept on a tight leash, under close and direct physician supervision. Midlevels should be forbidden from handling new patient encounters and formulating initial treatment plans, as examples like this make it clear that they do not possess the medical knowledge, training, and experience needed to do so.